Identifying typographic grids

Multicolumn grid

Grids aren’t immediately obvious.  It seems to be two columns in a two thirds one third ratio, though parts of a column may spill over the boundary.

Multicolumn grid

The pictures in these pages don’t seem to be in a grid like layout.  The text are in three columns.

Multicolumn grid

Again pictures in this particular layout aren’t very grid-like.

Multicolumn grid

This grid is made up from 3 to 5 columns with some parts of text/picture overlapping other areas.

Multicolumn grid

This layout has two columns in an one third two thirds ratio and has no pictures so layout is easier.

Multicolumn grid

This is more of a standard magazine which is divided up into three columns with the picture taking up a multiple, in this case, three columns.

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Tracing grids

Magazine Tracing 1

This was the beginning of an article on a travel destination.  It seems regardless of the magazine content, there’s always a ginormous picture to start off the article.  The first page rarely contains a majority of text.  There are three columns and about four rows counting the title and the sub-heading.

Magazine Tracing 2

The second page contains more text, but still opens with a picture (another pattern I noticed with gird designs).  There are still three columns and the pictures are still on the left side of the page like the first page, with the two right columns containing text.

CNET.com Tracing

CNET.com uses the grid system well with four distinct columns and six rows (some overlapping).  The pictures aren’t oversized and are very consistent with the heading/text underneath.  Very easy on the eyes while presenting the same info.